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Funding bold African innovations addressing health and development challenges

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Nairobi, Kenya, 22 May 2020 -

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COVID-19: Vaccine is Africa research priority

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(courtesy: SciDevNet)

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African countries struggle to find the coronavirus test kits they need

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(Courtesy: THE NEW HUMANITARIAN)
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Why the rich must urgently help poor beat coronavirus

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(Courtesy: STANDARD MEDIA)
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COVID-19: Vaccine is Africa research priority

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(courtesy: SciDevNet)

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The Big Picture (May Issue)

This May issue of the AAS Big Picture focuses on Africa's research priorities for COVID-19, AAS Future Campus, understanding African genes in the fight against malaria and ensuring equal opportunity for women in science. It also highlights funding opportunities in natural environment research, water pollutants, FLAIR fellowships and various science awards.

The Big Picture

This April issue of the AAS Big Picture focuses on the AAS' response to coronavirus in Africa, ensuring equal opportunity for women in science, improving indoor air quality and using nanomaterials to provide clean drinking water. It also highlights funding opportunities in biological sciences, healthy longevity and food systems.

The Big Picture

This March issue of the AAS Big Picture focuses on the Coronavirus situation in Africa, innovative methods to fight drug resistance and unveils the new GGC website. It also highlights funding opportunities in cancer prevention, snake bite research, climate resilience and land resource governance....

The Big Picture

This January/February issue of the AAS Big Picture focuses on the inclusion of more African women in science, unveils the new cohort of AAS Affiliates and promotes the second phase of the DELTAS Africa programme. It also highlights the importance of open access research as well as opportunities in research.   

Interesting science news from across the continent

This November/December issue of the AAS Big Picture focuses on the recent partnership between AAS and WHO, processing titanium alloys and why African scientists should apply for the Africa India Mobility Fund. It also highlights the importance of open access research as well as opportunities in research.

Origin of modern humans 'traced to Botswana'

This October issue of the AAS Big Picture showcases science in Africa tracing the origins of humankind, the fastest ants in the Sahara and exciting antimicrobial discoveries. It also highlights the importance of open access research as well as opportunities in both science journalism and biomedical research.

If you have content on science in Africa, funding opportunities or events feel free to email  communications@aasciences.africa by 15 November 2019 for inclusion in the next issue of the monthly  e-newsletter. 

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Why the rich must urgently help poor beat coronavirus

(Courtesy: The Standard)

We need to act fast, but also ensure that help is provided as humanly and as transparently as possible

In these challenging times, the world needs more than ever to help those most vulnerable to the effects of Covid-19.

Less affluent communities in the global south and north are vulnerable to the spread of the virus as self-isolation, lockdown, self-quarantine and social distancing will be extremely challenging.

COVID-19: Vaccine is Africa research priority

(courtesy: SciDevNet)

[NAIROBI] Africa’s research community says vaccine development should be a priority, a regional study has found.
 
Africa’s distinct research needs go beyond the global COVID-19 recommendations of the World Health Organization, and controlling the pandemic in Africa requires research and development that reflects the realities of its impact on the continent, the study suggests.
 
According to the findings of the survey conducted by the African Academy of Sciences (AAS), Africa needs to prioritise research and development areas such as infection prevention and control, including healthcare workers’ protection, as well as epidemiological studies and clinical management. 

This is the best time to plan for urban Africa’s next health emergency

(Courtesy: Quartz Africa)

Health, it turns out, is everybody’s business. The Covid-19 pandemic has made this clear, laying bare the gaping cracks in our societal systems that have driven the emergence and unprecedented transmission of a novel coronavirus; and highlighting the need for a more health-aligned societal reset.

An important step on the journey to reset is re-thinking and reframing our definition of an emergency response; and key to this is internalizing the preventable nature of (this and future) health emergencies. 

African scientists identify coronavirus priorities

(Courtesy: Research Professional News)

Life-saving interventions for resource-strained health settings trump basic biology research

Hundreds of African scientists have contributed to a prioritised list of coronavirus research for the continent published by the African Academy of Sciences on 28 April. 

The list shows that African scientists prioritise research that saves lives in resource-strained health settings over projects to answer basic biology questions about the new coronavirus.

Keeping COVID-19 at bay in Africa

(Courtesy: The Lancet)

On Feb 15, 2020, Egypt recorded Africa's first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) 12 days later, Nigeria recorded the first sub-Saharan Africa incident. 2 months later, the Comoro Islands and eSwatini are the only two countries of 54 in Africa that are unaffected by the global pandemic, stretching health systems and nearly paralysing economies.

The African Centre for Disease Control (Africa CDC), an African Union body partnering with the WHO Regional Office for Africa, is leading broad measures to control COVID-19. The disease has since accelerated in Africa, reaching 27 427 cases, 1298 deaths, and 7474 recoveries as of April 24. Compared with the rest of the world, Africa's infection rates are relatively low, but there is a growing sense of urgency given the acute absence of health-care infrastructure on the continent.

Coronavirus will play out very differently in world's poorest nations

(Courtesy: New Scientist)

The new coronavirus may prove disastrous for the world’s poorest people, including those living in slums and refugee camps.