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Genomics research in controlling Neglected Tropical Diseases

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The study reveals that even from a genetic point of view, the different communities across Africa have coped differently to their co-existence with disease causing organisms.
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Continental bodies collaborate to boost science granting councils

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The Association of African Universities (AAU) h

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African Academy of Sciences loses a Fellow

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AAS sadly announces the passing away of Prof. Viness Pillay. Prof. Pillay was elected Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences in 2012.
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Bridging the gender gap for women in science in Africa

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Cognizant of the gender disparity in STEM, the AESA platform (Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa - a partnership of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) and African Union Development Agency (AUDA-NEPAD)) with support from IAVI, a nonprofit scientific research organization, undertook a study to examine factors which contribute to or inhibit women from pursuing STEM careers in Africa.
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The true cost of doing research in African institutions

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Research institutions grapple with stalled or extended projects because their researchers underestimate the full cost of doing research.
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Teenagers drive TB awareness in Botswana

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Although, we have a vaccine administered at birth in most low-income countries, the protective effect of the vaccine wanes off at adolescence, and the risk of TB begins to rise from the age of 12 years, peaking among the 18-49 year age group.

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DELTAS Afica Scientific Conference 2019 – increasing visibility

Call for nominations: The AAS Fellowship 2019 NOMINATION DETAILS Call for The AAS Affiliates 2019

Apply for FLAIR Fellowships

The African Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society are accepting applications for the Future Leaders – African Independent Research (FLAIR) Fellowships until 15 May 2019. FLAIR fellowships provide the opportunity to build an independent research career in a sub-Saharan African institution and to undertake cutting-edge scientific research that will address global challenges facing developing countries.

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Engaging Traditional Birth Attendants to Reduce Maternal Depression

(Photo Credits: Copyright : Healthline, Parenthood)

Christine Musyimi is a Grand Challenges Africa (GC Africa) grantee based in Kenya. GC Africa is an African Academy of Sciences (AAS) Programme that seeks to promote Africa-led scientific innovations to help countries better achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by awarding seed and full grants to the continent’s most impressive solutions.

GC Africa is implemented through AESA (Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa), a funding, agenda setting and programme management platform of the AAS in partnership with the African Union Development Agency (AUDA-NEPAD). GC Africa is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Research priorities to achieve Africa’s food security and nutrition needs

The AAS is calling upon the diverse food security and nutrition stakeholders on the continent to participate in the prioritization survey to help set research priorities for the continent that will be followed by a call for proposals through the Grand Challenges Africa programme...

Bridging the gender gap for women in science in Africa

Cognizant of the gender disparity in STEM, the AESA platform (Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa - a partnership of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) and African Union Development Agency (AUDA-NEPAD)) with support from IAVI, a nonprofit scientific research organization, undertook a study to examine factors which contribute to or inhibit women from pursuing STEM careers in Africa...

Tanzanian traditional plant treats wounds

Background

There is increasing evidence of use of medicinal plants for treatment of a variety of skin conditions. Interest in this area has been driven by: increased resistance to several synthetic drugs by microbes causing skin conditions; availability and accessibility; safety issues and costs. Plants have long been the source of traditional treatment of various diseases and wounds in developing countries. Which plants or herbs are used for treatment of wounds and other ailments depends on the traditions and plant species grown in different regions of the world. In recent years, there is renewed global interest in discovering agents from natural resources that can be used as skin care products and also that will promote wound healing to reduce the cost of treatment and prevent complications from synthetic drugs. Commiphora swynnertonii, also known as myrrh, is among the commonly used tropical plants treating different diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that the extract form C. swynnertonii exhibits various biological mechanism to treat conditions such as arthritis, ulcers of different kinds (peptic, abscesses, cellulites, diabetic and tropical). Previous studies (Bakari et al., 2012, 2013, 2014) have demonstrated that the extract form of C. swynnertonii exhibits biological activity including antimicrobial effects; reducing blood sugar and cholesterol (Bakari et al., 2016 and Maghembe et al., 2017), increasing total white blood cell count and facilitation of fast healing of the wounds regardless of the nature of the wound.

Impacts of physical distancing for COVID-19 in Africa

As efforts to develop a vaccine or cure for COVID-19 intensify, countries are relying on physical distancing among other measures to slow down COVID-19 transmission. Physical distancing, by definition, reduces physical contact between individuals. In Africa, the stringency of these measures ranges from isolation and quarantine policies to partial and full lockdowns. While physical distancing has been shown to reduce infectious disease transmission, it also has unintended and negative health and socio-economic impacts. These undesirable impacts are of great concern in Africa because the continent has several vulnerabilities: 42% of the population living below the international poverty line, its informal settlement population represent 25% of all such populations across the world, an informal sector accounting for 84% of all employment, underfunded health systems and inadequate social safety-nets, among others. This blog presents some of the key findings from a rapid literature review on the health and socio-economic impacts of physical distancing in Africa.

Why Africa needs to address deafness

Hearing impairment (HI) remains one of the most disabling congenital — present from birth — diseases. HI burden is higher in Sub-Saharan Africa than elsewhere in the world...