Skip to main content

Latest Features

Up-to-date announcements, stories and opinion pieces from The AAS and researchers that we fund

Top This Week

Filter By

All

CATEGORY

All

Poster

Africa in a ‘sweet spot’ to lead global collaborations

Latest Feature

Africa has a history of being exploited by Western scientists, with helicopter research frequently downplaying the input and expertise of African scientists. However, turning our backs on global partners is not the solution, says University of Cape Town (UCT) Vice-Chancellor Professor Mamokgethi Phakeng.
Poster

Barriers to malaria interventions in Ghana

Case Studies

Malaria in pregnancy can have a devastating effect on pregnant women and their unborn children. Consequently, various intervention measures have been put in place to prevent and manage malaria among pregnant women in endemic countries such as Ghana. However, malaria continues to afflict some pregnant women.
Poster

Drivers of antimicrobial resistance in East Africa

Case Studies

It is estimated that at least 700,000 people die annually from infections that are resistant to currently available antibiotics worldwide, and that by 2050, antibiotic-resistant infections will kill an estimated 10 million people per year worldwide, including 4 million in Africa.
Poster

Disruptive effects of waste water pollution on aquatic biodiversity

Case Studies

One‐third of the drinking water necessary to sustain the world’s human population is obtained from surface water sources, which also serve as habitats for many amphibious and aquatic animals.
Poster

How I successfully applied for a postdoctoral fellowship

Case Studies

In April 2018, a request for applications was released for a prestigious APTI fellowship allowing Africans to spend two years at the NIH before returning to their home institutions where they are provided with 50% salary support for an additional two years to assist their transition into independent researchers.
Poster

Engaging traditional birth attendants to reduce maternal depression

Latest Feature

There is an increase in the number of people with mental health problems in Africa and this unfortunately occurs on a backdrop of insufficient human resources to detect them. Most African governments have deployed psychiatrists to rural settings, but such visits are typically short-term, with practitioners moving onto private practice after about a month.

Filter By

All

Call for nominations: The AAS Fellowship 2019 NOMINATION DETAILS Call for The AAS Affiliates 2019

Apply for FLAIR Fellowships

The African Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society are accepting applications for the Future Leaders – African Independent Research (FLAIR) Fellowships until 15 May 2019. FLAIR fellowships provide the opportunity to build an independent research career in a sub-Saharan African institution and to undertake cutting-edge scientific research that will address global challenges facing developing countries.

Filter By

All

CATEGORY

All

Research priorities to achieve Africa’s food security and nutrition needs

The AAS is calling upon the diverse food security and nutrition stakeholders on the continent to participate in the prioritization survey to help set research priorities for the continent that will be followed by a call for proposals through the Grand Challenges Africa programme...

Bridging the gender gap for women in science in Africa

Cognizant of the gender disparity in STEM, the AESA platform (Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa - a partnership of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) and African Union Development Agency (AUDA-NEPAD)) with support from IAVI, a nonprofit scientific research organization, undertook a study to examine factors which contribute to or inhibit women from pursuing STEM careers in Africa...

Tanzanian traditional plant treats wounds

Background

There is increasing evidence of use of medicinal plants for treatment of a variety of skin conditions. Interest in this area has been driven by: increased resistance to several synthetic drugs by microbes causing skin conditions; availability and accessibility; safety issues and costs. Plants have long been the source of traditional treatment of various diseases and wounds in developing countries. Which plants or herbs are used for treatment of wounds and other ailments depends on the traditions and plant species grown in different regions of the world. In recent years, there is renewed global interest in discovering agents from natural resources that can be used as skin care products and also that will promote wound healing to reduce the cost of treatment and prevent complications from synthetic drugs. Commiphora swynnertonii, also known as myrrh, is among the commonly used tropical plants treating different diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that the extract form C. swynnertonii exhibits various biological mechanism to treat conditions such as arthritis, ulcers of different kinds (peptic, abscesses, cellulites, diabetic and tropical). Previous studies (Bakari et al., 2012, 2013, 2014) have demonstrated that the extract form of C. swynnertonii exhibits biological activity including antimicrobial effects; reducing blood sugar and cholesterol (Bakari et al., 2016 and Maghembe et al., 2017), increasing total white blood cell count and facilitation of fast healing of the wounds regardless of the nature of the wound.

Impacts of physical distancing for COVID-19 in Africa

As efforts to develop a vaccine or cure for COVID-19 intensify, countries are relying on physical distancing among other measures to slow down COVID-19 transmission. Physical distancing, by definition, reduces physical contact between individuals. In Africa, the stringency of these measures ranges from isolation and quarantine policies to partial and full lockdowns. While physical distancing has been shown to reduce infectious disease transmission, it also has unintended and negative health and socio-economic impacts. These undesirable impacts are of great concern in Africa because the continent has several vulnerabilities: 42% of the population living below the international poverty line, its informal settlement population represent 25% of all such populations across the world, an informal sector accounting for 84% of all employment, underfunded health systems and inadequate social safety-nets, among others. This blog presents some of the key findings from a rapid literature review on the health and socio-economic impacts of physical distancing in Africa.

Exploring the adaptive capacity of fisheries in Africa

Increasing demand for water and associated ecosystem services is draining freshwater rivers and aquifers, while pollution and changing climate patterns are threatening the quality of aquatic resources of peri-urban lakes in impoverished and low-income African countries...

Why Africa needs to address deafness

Hearing impairment (HI) remains one of the most disabling congenital — present from birth — diseases. HI burden is higher in Sub-Saharan Africa than elsewhere in the world...